Australian Dollar to US Dollar Exchange Rate Today

Sunday, 21-Apr-24 11:07:31 UTC


$0.64

1 AUD to USD = 0.64 USD

The Most Popular Conversions from AUD to USD

  • 20 AUD to USD = 12.83 USD
  • 30 AUD to USD = 19.25 USD
  • 40 AUD to USD = 25.67 USD
  • 50 AUD to USD = 32.09 USD
  • 100 AUD to USD = 64.17 USD
  • 150 AUD to USD = 96.26 USD
  • 200 AUD to USD = 128.34 USD
  • 250 AUD to USD = 160.43 USD
  • 400 AUD to USD = 256.68 USD
  • 500 AUD to USD = 320.85 USD
  • 1000 AUD to USD = 641.70 USD
  • 3000 AUD to USD = 1,925.10 USD
  • 5000 AUD to USD = 3,208.50 USD
  • 10000 AUD to USD = 6,417.00 USD

Perhaps you were looking for the reverse exchange rate of USD to AUD?

AUD to USD chart (history graph)

FAQ about Australian Dollars to US Dollars conversions

How much is 1 Australian Dollar in US Dollars?

One Australian Dollar is equal to 0.64 US Dollars.

How much is 5 Australian Dollars in US Dollars?

The value of 5 AUD is 3.21 USD.

How much is 10 Australian Dollars in US Dollars?

The value of 10 AUD is 6.42 USD.

How much is 20 Australian Dollars in US Dollars?

The value of 20 AUD is 12.83 USD.

How much is 50 Australian Dollars in US Dollars?

The value of 50 AUD is 32.09 USD.

How much is 100 Australian Dollars in US Dollars?

The value of 100 AUD is 64.17 USD.

How much is 1000 Australian Dollars in US Dollars?

The value of 1000 AUD is 641.70 USD.


Use our Australian Dollar to US Dollar Calculator to calculate other currency amounts.

Why the Australian Dollar is weaker than the U.S. Dollar?

The relative weakness of the Australian Dollar (AUD) compared to the U.S. Dollar (USD) is influenced by several economic and financial factors. Here are some reasons why the Australian Dollar is weaker than the U.S. Dollar:

  • Interest Rates: If the U.S. Federal Reserve raises interest rates or has higher interest rates compared to the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA), it can attract foreign capital seeking higher returns in the U.S. This increased demand for the U.S. Dollar can contribute to the relative weakness of the Australian Dollar.
  • Economic Performance: Economic indicators such as GDP growth, employment rates, and manufacturing output can impact currency strength. If the U.S. economy is perceived as stronger or more stable than the Australian economy, it may lead to a stronger U.S. Dollar.
  • Trade Balances: The trade balance of a country, which is the difference between its exports and imports, can affect its currency. If Australia has a trade deficit (imports exceed exports), it can put downward pressure on the Australian Dollar.
  • Commodity Prices: Australia is a major exporter of commodities such as iron ore and coal. Changes in global commodity prices can influence the Australian Dollar. If commodity prices decline, it can negatively impact Australia's export earnings and contribute to a weaker currency.
  • Global Risk Sentiment: The U.S. Dollar is often considered a safe-haven currency, and during times of global economic uncertainty, investors may prefer holding U.S. Dollars. This increased demand for the U.S. Dollar can lead to the relative weakness of other currencies, including the Australian Dollar.
  • Government Debt Levels: Higher levels of government debt relative to GDP in Australia compared to the U.S. could affect investor confidence and contribute to a weaker Australian Dollar.

What is the Australian dollar called?

The Australian Dollar is commonly referred to as the "Aussie" in slang. This informal term is widely used in everyday conversation when talking about the Australian currency. So, if someone mentions the "Aussie", they are likely talking about the Australian Dollar.

All Australian Dollar Exchange Rates